Research Studies & Reports

DMV’s Research & Development Branch has been conducting research and producing studies and reports since the 1950s. Research & Development reports help DMV to measure the impact of new laws on making drivers safer. We also identify areas where we can improve our processes, explore new approaches to solving existing problems, and branch out into new opportunities to serve you better. 

Request printed copies of studies and reports by mail at:

Department of Motor Vehicles
Research and Development Branch
2570 24th Street, Mail Station: H-126
Sacramento, CA 95818
(916) 657-5805

Please include the report number, the number of copies requested, and your name, address, and phone number.

Report ID Title Section Links
232

California’s Three-Tier Driving-Centered Assessment System – Process Analysis

By: Bayliss J. Camp, Ph.D.

On September 14, 2006, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Assembly Bill 2542 (Daucher) into law, adding Section 1659.9 to the California Vehicle Code, and calling for a pilot study by the California Department of Motor Vehicles (CA DMV) of the 3-Tier Assessment System. This manuscript (the “process report”) constitutes the first of two reports on the 3-Tier Assessment System. It details the planning and implementation of the pilot, the process outcomes for the 12,346 CA DMV customers who participated in the pilot as well as the 4,853 customers who constituted a baseline comparison group, and the results of the subsequent multi-component process evaluation. The process evaluation includes a description of the costs to implement the pilot, discussion of various threats to the methodological validity of the process and outcome analyses, and an estimation of the potential costs of statewide implementation. An appendix to this report (published separately) contains more detailed analyses associated with four components of the process evaluation: the results of a survey of participating staff, the results of qualitative interviews conducted with participating staff, the results of a survey of pilot customers, and the results of an analysis of customer outcomes on the Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity assessment.

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234

California’s Three-Tier Driving-Centered Assessment System – Outcome Analysis

By: Bayliss J. Camp, Ph.D.

This Outcome Analysis constitutes the second of two reports on the 3-Tier Assessment System, as piloted by California DMV in 2006-2007. It contains (a) a projection of the costs associated with the Area Driving Performance Evaluation, (b) a determination of the willingness of a participant to pay a fee for the Area Driving Performance Evaluation, (c) a determination of the percentage of drivers who were assessed to have a limitation, but who, upon completion of the assessment, were able to retain their driving privileges, (d) the utilization of certified driving rehabilitation specialists, and (e) the results regarding crash rates and retention of driving privileges. Together, these analyses examine the effectiveness of the 3-Tier Assessment System in identifying functional impairments, reducing crashes, and extending safe driving years for California drivers of all ages. These analyses are based upon 2 years of elapsed driving history for the 12,279 customers who participated in the Pilot, along with two control groups: 14,907 customers in the Baseline II cohort, and 10,551 customers in the Nearby cohort. Based on limited data, an estimation is provided of the costs of the anticipated increase in the use of the ADPE, as associated with the 3-Tier Assessment System. Very few customers were willing to pay a fee for the ADPE. The overwhelming majority of customers, even those with functional limitations, were able to retain their driving privilege. No customers reported using certified driving rehabilitation specialists. The analyses found no evidence for a reduction in crash risk subsequent to participation in the Pilot; however, the analyses found some evidence that the Pilot is associated with an increased amount of time to complete the renewal process, with an increase in the odds of failing to renew the driving privilege, and with an increase in the odds of receiving a restricted license. Recommendations regarding implementation and future research are included.

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40

An Evaluation of California’s Oral Licensing Examination

By: David M. Harrington

To analyze the cost and effect of orally examining illiterate applicants.

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44

An Evaluation of the Drive Test as an Examination Requirement for Drivers Previously Licensed in Another State

By: David M. Harrington

To determine if waiving the drive test for original applicants previously licensed in another state would be detrimental to their driving records.

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46.1

An abstract of An Evaluation of California’s “Good Driver” Incentive Program

By: Richard M. Harano & David M. Hubert

To study the effects of rewards and/ or incentives in the form of one-year license extensions (no testing or visit to field office required) for drivers with one-year-clean prior records.

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46

An Evaluation of California’s “Good Driver” Incentive Program

By: Richard M. Harano & David M. Hubert

To study the effects of rewards and/ or incentives in the form of one-year license extensions (no testing or visit to field office required) for drivers with one-year-clean prior records.

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51

An Evaluation of California’s Drivers Licensing Examination

By: Dell R. Dreyer

To assess the ability of the written knowledge test and the drive test to screen out accident-prone drivers; to provide descriptive data on the licensing process, with particular interest in the performance of older drivers.

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52.1

An Abstract of An Evaluation of the California Driver Knowledge Test and the University of Michigan Item Pool

By: David W. Carpenter

To evaluate both the written DMV driver licensing test and a large sample of driver knowledge test items selected from the University of Michigan's Highway Safety Research Institute (HSRI) item pool.

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52

An Evaluation of the California Driver Knowledge Test and the University of Michigan Item Pool

By: David W. Carpenter

To evaluate both the written DMV driver licensing test and a large sample of driver knowledge test items selected from the University of Michigan's Highway Safety Research Institute (HSRI) item pool.

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60.1

An Abstract of The Effectiveness of an At-Home Drivers’ Licensing Law Test

By: David M. Harrington & Michael Ratz

To explore new approaches to testing which would cost less, be more convenient to the public, and reduce accidents and convictions.

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