Research Studies & Reports

DMV’s Research & Development Branch has been conducting research and producing studies and reports since the 1950s. Research & Development reports help DMV to measure the impact of new laws on making drivers safer. We also identify areas where we can improve our processes, explore new approaches to solving existing problems, and branch out into new opportunities to serve you better. 

Request printed copies of studies and reports by mail at:

Department of Motor Vehicles
Research and Development Branch
2570 24th Street, Mail Station: H-126
Sacramento, CA 95818
(916) 657-5805

Please include the report number, the number of copies requested, and your name, address, and phone number.

390 Results

Report ID Date Published Title Section Links
87 1983/ 08

The Traffic Safety Impact of California’s New Drunk Driving Law (AB 541)-An Evaluation of the First Nine Months of Experience

By: Raymond C. Peck

To determine if the new drunk driving law (AB 541) had any impact on the incidence of alcoholrelated traffic accidents.

III
16 1964/ 12

The Totally Deaf Driver in California, Part II

By: Ronald S. Coppin & Raymond C. Peck

To determine whether or not the driving records of deaf drivers differ from those of non-deaf drivers, and whether or not deafness or other factors are responsible for any differences found. Specifically, the study was designed to ascertain whether the deaf driver represents a special risk to public safety and, if so, to suggest any necessary licensing restrictions or unique training needs.

VI
15 1963/ 07

The Totally Deaf Driver in California, Part I

By: Ronald S. Coppin & Raymond C. Peck

To determine whether or not the driving records of deaf drivers differ from those of non-deaf drivers, and whether or not deafness or other factors are responsible for any differences found. Specifically, the study was designed to ascertain whether the deaf driver represents a special risk to public safety and, if so, to suggest any necessary licensing restrictions or unique training needs.

VI
21 1965/ 02

The Teen-Aged Driver

By: Gareth S. Ferdun, Ronald S. Coppin & Raymond C. Peck

To examine the accident and conviction records of teenaged drivers to determine whether or not a change in the licensing age was warranted and whether or not behind-the-wheel driver training was effective in reducing accidents and convictions.

IV
167 1997/ 01

THE SPECIFIC DETERRENT IMPACT OF CALIFORNIA’S 0.08% BLOOD ALCOHOL CONCENTRATION LIMIT AND ADMINISTRATIVE PER SE LICENSE SUSPENSION LAWS

By: Patrice N. Rogers

This project evaluated the impact of two new California driving-under-the-influence (DUI) laws on the subsequent alcohol-related accident and recidivism rates of apprehended DUI offenders. The first law, effective January 1, 1990, reduced the state’s illegal per se blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limit to 0.08% and the second, effective just six months later, on July 1, 1990, imposed an administrative per se (APS) pre-conviction license suspension on arrested DUI offenders. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the specific deterrent impact of the new laws by comparing the subsequent recidivism and alcohol-related accident rates of DUI offenders arrested before and after implementation of the new laws.

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NRN022 1981/ 01

The Sanctioning Process and the DUI Offender

By: Roger E. Hagen

To increase knowledge and awareness of the state-of-the-art of drunk driver sanction effectiveness.

III
NRN009 1985/ 06

The Role of Youth in Traffic Accidents: A Review of Past and Current California Data

By: Raymond C. Peck

To clarify the role of youth in traffic accident causation.

II
NRN044 1970/ 01

The Relationship of Perceptual Style of Drivers to Accident/Violation Experience

By: Patricia Isham

To explore the ability of the Stimulus Accretion Impending Hazard (SAIH) test to measure drivers' propensity for accident or violation involvement.

IV
NRN043 1969/ 01

The Relationship Between Field Dependence and Motor Vehicle Accident Involvement

By: Richard M. Harano

To determine if any relationship exists between motor vehicle accidents and a perceptual response style referred to as field dependence (measured on response to figure / ground stimuli).

IV
142 1994/ 01

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DRUG ARRESTS AND DRIVING RISK

By: Leonard A. Marowitz

This study compared the driving records of 106,214 persons arrested for drug offenses in 1989 with 41,493 comparison drivers drawn from the general driving population. The drug arrestees were grouped according to the six summary offense categories used by the Department of Justice (DOJ), which were felony narcotics, marijuana, dangerous drugs, and other drugs, and misdemeanor marijuana and other drugs. Time periods examined were 1 year pre-arrest, 1 year post-arrest and 2 years post-arrest. Each drug arrestee group had significantly more traffic violations and total accidents than the control group, except for 2 year post-arrest accidents for the felony narcotics group. Measures of accident culpability showed drug arrestees to be more responsible for the accidents in which they were involved than was the general driving population. Individuals arrested for drug offenses clearly pose an elevated traffic safety risk. These findings provide a public safety justification for state and federal initiatives designed to institute driver licensing actions against drug offenders, and support for the implementation of Public Law 101-516 in California.

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